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7.62 Nagant

Warning: Bullet selections are specific, and loads are not valid with substitutions of different bullets of the same weight. Variations in bullet material and length will alter net case capacity,  pressure and velocity results. Primer selection is specific and primer types are not interchangeable. These data represents maximum loads in our firearms and test equipment…

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The Ruger American Rifle Ranch & 350 Legend – More Factory Ammo Winchester and Hornady ammo for the deer, bear and hog hunter

In early exposure to the 350 Legend, Ruger’s Compact American Rifle Ranch and the 350 Legend Part I and Ruger’s Compact American Rifle Ranch and the 350 Legend Part II, the 350 Legend proved to be not only an excellent cartridge for the deer hunter in states where only straight wall cartridges are mandated, but also in any hunting environment where shots are inside 200 yards. By dimension and operating pressure, the 350 Legend cartridge is well suited to bolt action, lever action and auto-loading firearms..

Glad to see the arrival of more factory ammunition for the 350 Legend. The presence of more manufacturers will push performance and evolution of the cartridge, give the new round greater traction in the market place and brand competition will make for reasonable prices. The Hornady 350 Legend 170 Grain Interlock® American Whitetail® ammunition underscores those points.

Comparing the Hornady 350 Legend 170 Grain Interlock® American Whitetail® with Winchester’s Power-Point 180 grain ammunition because of their similarities in application and bullet weights should be straight forward. Unfortunately, each manufacturer has their own perspective on conventions used for ballistic tables and each presents specification information differently.

Winchester applies a 100 yard zero to exterior ballistics and Hornady applies a 200 yard zero. Winchester publishes a ballistic coefficient for its Power-Point bullet, 0.221, Hornady did not post a BC for its Interlock bullet. Both Winchester and Hornady published data are based on a 20″ barrel while, as of 04/09/2019, the SAAMI standard test barrel length is 16″.

The Ranch version of the Ruger American Rifle used has a 16.38″ barrel. Rather than set an arbitrary fixed zero distance, we used a best zero for a 6″ target . The ballistic coefficient for the Hornady bullet, 0.2136, was derived by hitting reverse on the exterior ballistic calculator until the curves matched.

Live fire

Over the chronograph, the Winchester ammunition rated at 2100 fps, clocked 2091 fps, Hornady ammunition rated at 2200 fps, clocked 2190 fps. The difference between rated and actual velocity was essentially the same for both types. Considering the difference between the 20″ barrel used as the standard, that is very good performance from a firearm with a 4″ shorter barrel.

The Hornady cartridge puts 100 fps on the Winchester round 2190 fps versus 2091, so even though the Hornady has a lighter 170 grain bullet, it cranks out 1811 ft-lbs of kinetic energy at the muzzle, compared to 1651 ft-lbs for the Winchester round; energy increases as the square of the velocity.

How does that look with some of the other exterior ballistic elements?

The Winchester assumptions are based on recorded muzzle velocity, a 165 yard best zero, a 176 yard point blank range and a maximum ordinate of +3″. The Hornady assumptions are based on recorded muzzle velocity, a 172 yard best zero, 182 yard point blank range and a maximum ordinate of +3″.

 

Winchester 180 Grain Power-Point & Hornady 170 Grain American Whitetail
Yards 0 50 100 150 200 250 300
Winchester Velocity – fps 2091 1919 1756 1602 1463 1337 1229
Hornady Velocity – fps
2190 2007 1833 1669 1519 1383 1264
Winchester Energy – ft.-lbs 1747 1471 1232 1026 855 714 604
Hornady Energy ft-lbs
1810 1520 1269 1052 871 722 603
Winchester Momentum – lbs-sec 54 49 45 41 38 34 32
Hornady Momentum – lbs-sec 53 49 45 41 37 34 31
Winchester Path – inches -1.50 1.92 2.97 1.20 -3.97 -13.21 -27.31
Hornady Path – inches -1.50 1.83 2.99 1.56 -3.00 -11.33 -24.22
Winchester Time Of Flight – sec. 0.00 0.07 0.16 0.25 0.34 0.45 0.57
Hornady Time of Flight – sec 0.00 0.07 0.15 0.24 0.33 0.43 0.55

The Winchester Power-Point and Hornady Whitetail ammunition offer similar performance, with Hornady holding a a slight edge. Repeatable accuracy yielded similar results.

The combination of short barrel Ruger American Rifle Ranch and 350 Legend cartridge has proven to be inherently accurate. Working with handloads, drawing down bullets and picking through a variety of powders, handloads produced group 100 yard sizes down to half inch. Winchester 145 grain FMJ factory ammo shot a best of 1 1/4″ in one of our first projects with this combination, the 180 grain Winchester Power-Point consistently shot 1.0″ groups, warm or cold barrel. The Hornady Whitetail ammo consistently shot 0.8″ groups, also warm or cold barrel. Makes it difficult to justify handloads for medium to large game hunting unless, you’re loading a particular bullet type that is not available with over the counter ammunition.

I can’t say exactly why the Hornady ammo delivered greater accuracy, but I would attribute it to the difference in bullet form and the effect that has on pressure, barrel vibration and perhaps bullet center of pressure.

The Winchester appearance is a bit deceptive. The heel of the bullet is 0.355″ but tapers to 0.353″ just aft of the ogive. Might be to create a home for a taper crimp, but it would also decrease bore friction. The Hornady has a short shank and long ogive, which serves to reduce bore friction to a greater extent.

Cartridge OAL Bullet
Grains
Bullet
OAL”
Shank
Length”
Ogive
Length”
Case
Net
Capacity
Winchester 2.165 180 0.855 0.440 0.415 25.7
Hornady 2.250 170 0.880 0.360 0.520 27.2

A lot of work to get to a 30-30 WCF…

Yeah, I know. There is always one in the bunch. Still the case as where we came in, the cartridge was released to accommodate hunters in states where they are restricted to use straight body cartridges and the 30-30 WCF is a bottle neck cartridge. Additionally, the 350 Legend utilizes bullets of a significantly larger diameter, it is more accurate than the 30-30 WCF cartridge, and its length fits the dimensional constraints of modern sporting rifles… AKA AR-15.

Spicy Refried Beans – They Taste Better Than They Look Without the sugar, without sodium, without fat and most artery clogging ingredients

A lot of email followed the split pea recipe article. Some of it was “Hey! Stop it! I want guns!…!!”, some of it was, “Hey! Cool!, but the real curiosity was that it was heavily read. So we thought we might do it again., only with beans instead of peas. No longer able to eat…

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Smith & Wesson’s Performance Center M&P 45 Shield Part II Live fire... does the rest really matter?

So far, this has been what I can only term an agricultural year. My wife and I put in a couple of raised vegetable gardens and some grow bags and we are well on our way to a harvest of potatoes, peppers, corn, onions… three kinds, carrots, beans, strawberries, and some kind of green stuff that looks like horizontal patches of porcupine quills. For the first time in years, all of the fruit trees are producing and if the wild life does not get to them first, we should have pears, peaches and plumbs. If I could only get a plant to produce a good hamburger or steak… virtually anything I am not supposed to eat. I would be lying if I said it isn’t fun; rural living, growing food for the table and wandering out back and shooting firearms when I choose.

Time was taken to shoot the Smith & Wesson Performance Center M&P 45 Shield M2.0 with both factory ammunition and handloads. All and all it did very well. No jams, no failures to fire and the slide locked open on empty even with low velocity target loads. More specifically…

45 Automatic Bullet
Type
Bullet
Weight
Grains
Rated
MV
FPS
Actual
MV
FPS
50′
5 Shot
Group
ARX Poly/Copper 118 1350 1347 2.1
Speer Gold Dot JHP 185 1050 923 1.9
Federal JHP 185 1050 877 1.6
Remington UD BJHP 230 875 803 1.5
Remington GS BJHP 230 875 729 1.6
American Eagle FMJ 230 890 765 2.0

The 45 Shield is a very manageable pistol. Considering its light weight, narrow form and mission, that is a big deal. It won’t make an owner flinch in anticipation of recoil in dire circumstances and it won’t cause proficiency practice avoidance when a few fifty count boxes of ammo are planned for a range session.

ARX, despite eyebrow raising velocity, had the lightest recoil. The  Remington duo, Ultimate Defense and Golden Saber are two of my favorites. They are slow, but they always expand without fragmenting and they penetrate in the 12″ to 14″ range in ballistic gel even when fired from a short barrel handgun. That said, all except the American Eagle FMJ ball ammo clone are good personal defense loads. The saving grace for the Fed ammo is low price for practice outings.

Al Green, as a matter of fact…

A hundred years and a lot of cars ago, Dick Simonek’s shop in Paterson, NJ’s Gasoline Alley used to do all of the machine work on our racing engines. Nicest people you’d want to meet. Unlike some of the other shops in the U shaped arrangement of race car related business, Simonek’s shop was clean and orderly, people were neat and articulate and there was always FM radio playing easy listening music in the background. A mellow, but very productive environment with high quality service.

FM is dead, but it has been reincarnated in the form of Sirius and Alexa. A little background music seems to be brain wave amplitude leveling and that  helps focus. The trick is to find something that has the influence, but requires no real attention to enjoy. So a little less Lee Rocker and a little more Al Green. If you begin with “Tired of Being Lonely” and end with “L-O-V-E” you’ll be able to crank out serious volumes on a progressive press and still hold an air mic while singing.

Five good bullets…

Originally, there were a couple of semi wad cutters in the group, but I did not feel they fed reliably enough to include in the group. Nothing wrong with the Smith & Wesson pistol, as it cycled 100% with everything else and 45 Automatic Match ammo, by SAAMI definition, is physically different from standard and +P 45 Automatic ammunition. Overall Match is 0.050″ shorter in both minimum and maximum cartridge overall length and I suspect the 45 SWC form was designed to hold an auto-loader’s slide partially open at the most opportune times.

Cartridge: 45 Automatic
Firearm S&W M&P 45 Shield
Barrel Length 4.0″
Min – Max Case Length 0.898″ +0.0″/-0.010″
Min – Max Cartridge Overall Length* 1.190″ – 1.275″
Primer CCI 300 – Large Pistol
Bullet Diameter – Jacketed**
0.4520″ +0.0″/-0.003″
Reloading Dies RCBS
* Min-Max Cartridge Overall Length Match  SWC 1.140″ – 1.255″
** Bullet Diameter Cast
  0.4530″ +0.0″/-0.003″

 

 Bullet Type  Bullet Weight
Grains
Net H2O
Grains
Capacity
COL” Powder Type Powder Charge
Grains
Muzzle Velocity
fps
Muzzle
Energy
ft-lbs
50′
5 Shot
Group”
Barnes XPB 185 7.4 1.235 AA No.7 9.0 1009 418 2.2
Barnes XPB 185 7.4 1.235 Long Shot 7.0 904 336 2.0
Barnes XPB 185 7.4 1.235 RS Silhouette 6.8 994 406 2.3
Speer Gold Dot 185 15.8 1.200 Power Pistol 9.5 1085  484 1.9
Speer Gold Dot 185 15.8 1.200 CFE Pistol 9.0 1093  491 1.7
Speer Gold Dot 185 15.8 1.200 AutoComp 9.0 1087  485 1.5
Remington GS 185 15.6 1.200 AA No.7 12.5 1113 509 1.7
Remington GS 185 15.6 1.200 Power Pistol 9.2 1106 502 1.8
Remington GS 185 15.6 1.200 Long Shot 9.5 1107 504 1.7
Hornady HP/XTP 200 15.1 1.230 AA No.7 12.4 1090  528 2.0
Hornady HP/XTP 200 15.1 1.230 Blue Dot 12.0 1086  523 1.9
Hornady HP/XTP 200 15.1 1.230 Power Pistol 9.2 1091  529 2.1
Acme FN 225 12.5 1.205 AA No.7 10.6 987 486 1.6
Acme FN 225 12.5 1.205 Power Pistol 7.8 980 480 1.9
Acme FN 225 12.5 1.205 RS True Blue 7.7 951 452 2.1

Good sights, good trigger good feel…

Ballistic performance was good; the pistol is accurate and the 45 Automatic is a convincing round. For me, the red dot is faster tracking a moving target where there is no front and rear points to align. The red dot adjusted to varying light conditions and was not lost even in bright sunlight. The fiber optic sights grab ambient light, making them always clearly visible.

As a defensive weapon, a passive drop safety system is a big plus, as the 45 Shield requires only a deliberate trigger pull to fire. There is no fumbling around for a thumb safety, worrying above compressing a grip safety and the striker action can be safely carried with a round in the chamber… no inconvenient slide racking.

The S&W Performance Center 45 Shield M2.0 is a high performance, moderately priced handgun that will provide many years of life defending service.

17 Hornet Handload Data

Warning: Bullet selections are specific, and loads are not valid with substitutions of different bullets of the same weight. Variations in bullet length will alter net case capacity,  pressure and velocity. Primer selection is specific and primer types are not interchangeable. These are maximum loads in my firearms and may be excessive in others. All…

Real Guns is a membership supported publication. Membership offers access to: all current and archived articles, handload data, ballistic calculators, and the Real Guns Image Gallery. Membership is available for $29.95 for twelve months.

Please either Sign inorJoin Real Guns.